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Historical Echoes Tea & Performance


Abigail Adams

Saturday Aug. 18,
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Opera House Grand Ballroom
Tickets: $30 (Price Includes Preservation FEE)

Light Afternoon Tea & Personality - wife of John Adams and voice of women's rights through him at the organizing congress of the United States. Remember her admonition to her husband, John, during the Continental Congress... "Remember the Ladies." Her son was instrumental as a translator to Catherine the Great of Russia. Reserve your spot, bring a friend and round out a special afternoon experience for friendship and hospitality. Reservations are due by August 11 for catering needs. Call for special needs.

Dr. Karen Horney, MD

Saturday Aug. 18,
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Opera House Grand Ballroom
Tickets: $30 (Price Includes Preservation FEE)

Light Afternoon Tea & Personality - Dr. Karen (neÄ— Danielson) Horney, M.D. was a member in the second medical school class graduating (1911) in Germany that admitted women. Karen plotted against the control and limitations of an abusive Father. She gained her right as a teenager to Gymnasium education based on merit and a promise to never ask her father for any support. She explored her worldly freedoms and tested the limits of being a woman in the early 20th century. Karen circulated as an equal with University students and decided to become a physician. At the time, University curricula and professors did not respect Sigmund Freud’s work or publications. She hid her interest in mental health to secure the medical diploma and medical status. After writing an acceptable (to the professors) thesis, she turned around and declared that she would pursue research under Dr. Freud. Karen had a mind of her own and studied neurosis of the human condition. She took issue with Freud’s male-centrist view of mental health and human development. She published against the great doctor’s opinions that the male psyche was the norm and the female psyche was only a derivative of the perfect and normal male. Part of her challenge came from introspection during her first pregnancy. She asserted that males, such as Freud, spent time convincing themselves and others of their superiority by an obsession with work and money production. She posited their unrelenting struggle to convince themselves of a superior capability rose directly from their biological inability to produce and birth a child. Dr. Horney coined the word womb envy in direct counter to Freud’s penis envy teachings. The Berlin Psychological Associated supported Dr. Freud and further asserted her unhappy position was due to her being a woman. The Nazi’s of WW II were amassing against German Psychologists and Psychoanalysts because many, including Freud, were Jewish. Dr. Horney saw the gathering troubles and immigrated to America. Karen's story includes the culture shock in Chicago where she took a University position. She was dismayed that the pride of Chicago and of tourism included the stockyards. She was more comfortably ensconced with the intellectuals and psychologist of New York. J. Edgar Hoover kept a large file on Dr. Horney. He and his associates tracked testimonials from neighbors who reported airplane noises followed by a radio signal from her island cottage home. He also collected the word of a local Postmistress who complained Dr. Horney regularly sent money to addresses in Germany and in Mexico. In fact, Karen had an adult daughter and, film actor in Germany at the time and another daughter and family living in Mexico. Her file was erroneously tagged as a subversive or communist sympathizer. This was discovered and corrected after prolonged battles that indicated another Karen Horney’s file information at the Bureau had been mixed with Dr. Horney’s file. In 1952, she was finally granted a travel Visa to Japan to study Zen Buddhist influences on psychology. Dr. Horney was forever curious, thinking, and learning. Her work has inspired other research and laid to groundwork for feminist theories of the 1960s. Her psychodynamic psychotherapy clinic remains active in New York City.

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